Tag Archives: orangutans

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Depleted forests force Borneo Orangutans to nest in oil palm estates

Our furry orange friends are just trying to find a place to sleep for the night… they’ve had to go from secure and cozy places where they could make a nice bed for themselves, to the orangutan equivalent of sleeping under a bridge.

Depleting forest forces Orangutans to nest in oil palm estates

Posted on July 1, 2014, Tuesday | Borneo Post Online

SANDAKAN: A new landmark study based in Sabah’s east coast has shown that orangutans in Kinabatangan have no choice but to nest in oil palm plantations as they travel from one forest patch to another.

“These findings have long term implications for the oil palm industry and those working in conservation as we have to look at a larger landscape rather than concentrate only on forested areas,” said Dr Marc Ancrenaz, the lead author of the findings published in Oryx, the international journal of conservation…

“Where were these missing orangutans. We knew they could not have just disappeared from the small forested areas of lower Kinabatangan. So we looked outside the forested areas and what we found, truly shocked us,” said Ancrenaz who is also scientific director of HUTAN-KOCP, in a statement yesterday.

Ancrenaz said the researchers found that orangutan nests within the oil palm landscape within small patches of trees, even single trees.

“The orangutans are not adapting to the oil palm and are using them to find other forested areas. This means the palm oil industry now has a very important role to play to sustain the long term survival of the orangutan population living in Kinabatangan and other agricultural lands in Sabah.”

The study also found the orangutans only used the oil palm plants to nest when they had no access to native trees and usually did not go too far inside with 90 percent detected within 100 metres of the forest edge, although it did find that some had roamed further inside.

Read more:  http://www.theborneopost.com/2014/07/01/depleting-forest-forces-orangutans-to-nest-in-oil-palm-estates/#ixzz36ByM977S

 

 

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How Many Products with Palm Oil Do You Use in a Day?

I think… I hope… I’m doing a bit better than Lael Goodman, the author of this post: “How Many Products with Palm Oil Do I Use in a Day?

But I don’t really have a kitchen where I am now, so what oil is used at the hawker centers and cafeterias where I mostly eat is not something I’ve even begun to investigate.  And yeah, even the organic brands of toothpaste, soap, shampoo, etc. are frequently made with palm oil.  Here’s some of Lael’s daily guilt trip:

…But even though I know that palm oil is ubiquitous in everyday products, I’ve never assessed its role in my life. That was, until yesterday.

What I found was astonishing, even to me: I use palm oil and its derivatives every single day. Multiple times a day…

In just one day, I used at least twelve products that contain or might contain palm oil:

[1] Kellogg’s Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory Limited Edition Cereal: Chocolatey Almond: hydrogenated palm kernel oil, palm kernel oil
[2] P&G’s Head and Shoulders shampoo: sodium lauryl sulfate*, sodium laureth sulfate*
[3] L’Oréal’s Garnier Fructis conditioner: cetyl alcohol*
[4] Unilever’s Dove white beauty bar soap: stearic acid*, sodium palmitate*
[5] Unilever’s Vaseline body lotion: stearic acid*, cetyl alcohol*, glyceryl stearate*, glycerin*
[6] Galderma’s Cetaphil moisturizer with sunscreen: glyceryl stearate*
[7] Colgate-Palmolive’s Colgate toothpaste: sodium lauryl sulfate*
[8] Revlon’s Almay mascara: stearic acid*
[9] Daily vitamins: vegetable magnesium stearate*, vegetable stearic acid*
[10] J.M. Smucker’s Jif natural peanut butter: palm oil
[11] Pfizer’s Chapstick lip balm: cetyl alcohol*, tocopheryl linoleate*
[12] Unilever’s Pond’s cold cream: cetyl alcohol*

It’s easy to think that because I don’t regularly frequent McDonald’s or Dunkin’ Donuts that my palm oil use is limited. But I can see now that palm oil is pervasive in both my professional and my personal life.

Luckily, a lot of companies whose brands I use have already begun stepping up to the challenge by making commitments to ensure that the palm oil they use is free of deforestation and peatland destruction. I know my Colgate-Palmolive toothpaste,  L’Oréal conditioner, Kellogg’s cereal, and Unilever soap, lotion, and cream are made by companies who have made this public commitment, making my daily routine a little more sustainable.

Click here to send an email to other companies urging them to make a deforestation and peat-free palm oil commitment.

from http://blog.ucsusa.org/how-many-products-with-palm-oil-do-i-use-in-a-day?

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Good News (at last): A Palm Oil Victory

Re-posting from forestheroes.org

Why all the fuss about palm oil to begin with? Well if you’re new to the campaign and this blog, the palm oil industry is currently one of the most environmentally destructive on the planet. The rapid spread of palm oil plantations is responsible for rampant deforestation, endangered species habitat loss, and severe climate and local air pollution. Though there are now hopes that today’s announcement could begin to change that.

Wilmar’s new “No Deforestation, No Peat, No Exploitation Policy” would, if implemented, catalyze a wholesale change in how palm oil is produced, and where plantations are sited.

So what exactly does the policy entail? Basically, it calls for numerous provisions to change the way commodities are sourced:

  • No Deforestation: No more cutting down the rainforest for agricultural production.
  • No Exploitation: Protect the rights of workers and communities, including the right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent.
  • Protects High Carbon Stock landscape: Including peatlands of any depth.
  • Protects High Conservation Value forests: No more clearing of forests that are habitat for endangered species, such as orangutans, Sumatran tigers, elephants, and rhinos.

Up until now, the largely unregulated — and rapidly growing — industry has laid waste to more than 30,000 square miles of tropical rainforests in Indonesia and Malaysia alone. Palm oil is a $50 billion a year commodity that winds up in roughly half of all consumer goods for sale, including snacks and sweets and soaps and detergents and countless other packaged goods. Over the past decade alone, palm oil imports to the U.S. have increased nearly fivefold. The incredible loss of richly biodiverse rainforests to clearcutting also threatens the 400 or so remaining Sumatran tigers, as well as orangutans, elephants, and rhinos. Not to mention the tens of millions of people who depend on the forests to survive. Then there’s the climate impact of stripping the world of some of its most important carbon sinks. Factor in forest loss, and Indonesia is the world’s third largest source of global warming pollution.

Just days left to save Aceh’s forests – Sumatran Orangutan Society

Last week, I gave yet another talk on orangutan conservation, with student presentations about the problems with palm oil, deforestation, mining and the bushmeat trade and how these threaten nonhuman primates.  Today there’s another urgent plea to save one of our most endangered relatives:

Earlier this year, more than a million people around the worldUrgent Campaign: Save Aceh's Forests, Wildlife and People called on the Governor of Aceh to abandon plans to carve up the irreplaceable Leuser Ecosystem with new roads, plantations and gold mines. The global outcry succeeded in delaying the province’s new spatial plan.

But it hasn’t been abandonned – yet. The decision will be made this month. The plan must be rejected. Please read about the campaign here, and sign the new petition today, there’s no time to lose.

Please share this urgent campaign far and wide – the wildlife, forests and people of Aceh need you now more than ever before.

re-posted from SOS Newsletter

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Published today in Science Creative Quarterly

My Great Ape Haikus were published today in the lovely and amazing SCQ.  Check it out!THE SCIENCE CREATIVE QUARTERLY’S MOST EXCEPTIONAL, ILLUSTRIOUS, SPLENDIFEROUS HAIKU PHYLOGENY PROJECT

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Orange October – Sumatran Orangutan Society

Do something amazing for orangutans in Orange October!

Sumatran Orangutan Society‘s  Orange October Guide has 31 ideas – one for every day of the month – from having an Orange Day at work or school, to carving an orangutan pumpkin for Halloween. There are lots of suggestions that would be great for younger OranguFans too.

By helping spread the word and raising funds for SOS, you will be helping us to protect orangutans, their forests and their future. Thank you … and have fun!

Click here to download the Orange October Guide

 Orange October – Sumatran Orangutan Society.

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Originally posted on endoftheicons:
By IZILWANE–Voices for Biodiversity on August 12, 2013 Your family carefully sorts your trash and composts table scraps weekly and tries really hard to remember to bring cloth or canvas bags to the grocery store. Some…

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Today is the first World Orangutan Day!

World Orangutan Day

Reforesting Sumatra

The Sumatran Orangutan Society has launched a new reforestation campaign, complete with an animated video.  They employ local people to plant trees that will help a diverse rainforest recover.

1 million trees for orangutans!

Today we planted the millionth tree at our forest restoration site in Sumatra. A heartfelt thank you to everyone who helped us reach this amazing milestone.

To celebrate, we have launched an animation, voiced by SOS patron Bill Bailey, featuring the rather charming Armstrong! You can watch the animation here.

We would also love you to visit SaveArmstrong.com, a new website where you can plant a tree (or five!) to help us build a brighter future for Sumatra’s forests, its wildlife and its people.

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3 Days to Stop Catastrophic Deforestation Planned in Sumatra

Catastrophic deforestation planned in Sumatra – from Sumatran Orangutan Society

We urgently need your help to stop the planned destruction of 1.2 million hectares of forest in Sumatra for gold mining, oil palm plantations, logging and roads.

This is a conservation emergency for orangutans, tigers, elephants and rhinos – the forests under threat are the only place in the world where these critically endangered species still roam together.

Indonesia’s President has the power to stop these plans. Please help us reach 1 million signatures in the next 3 days to make sure he gets the message loud and clear.

This is a new petition, so please sign and share even if you have already signed others in the last few weeks.

The fate of Sumatra’s forests will be decided in the very near future  – please help.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN THE PETITION.

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