Tag Archives: local

Reforesting Sumatra

The Sumatran Orangutan Society has launched a new reforestation campaign, complete with an animated video.  They employ local people to plant trees that will help a diverse rainforest recover.

1 million trees for orangutans!

Today we planted the millionth tree at our forest restoration site in Sumatra. A heartfelt thank you to everyone who helped us reach this amazing milestone.

To celebrate, we have launched an animation, voiced by SOS patron Bill Bailey, featuring the rather charming Armstrong! You can watch the animation here.

We would also love you to visit SaveArmstrong.com, a new website where you can plant a tree (or five!) to help us build a brighter future for Sumatra’s forests, its wildlife and its people.

Capitola Bags the Bag

It’s time to Bag the (Plastic) Bag! Way to go, City of Capitola.

Getting sensible about transportation options

In Santa Cruz county, we’re starting to have some conversations about transit and land use.  A few interesting thoughts along those lines:

City-builders across the globe understand the relative cheapness of the bike mobility option, in both cost and space. Dollar for dollar, bike lanes move people more cost effectively from a return-on-investment perspective than any other way of getting around, especially once a tipping point of cyclists is reached — and that doesn’t even factor in the well-documented public health cost savings that come from widespread biking. Global studies have shown investing in cycling infrastructure actually saves society public money per kilometer cycled! The math is enough to make any real fiscal conservative hop on a two-wheeler…

…mobility flows from smart land use choices, and the best transportation plan is a great land-use plan. [Brent Toderian: It’s Not About the Bike or the Car — It’s About Better Cities]

I think we have a chance to improve here.  I hope we really take advantage of it.

Aside

Leaf blowers are another pet peeve of mine (I collect them by the bushel). Here’s a clever idea from Owen Dell that I found on the Terra Nova Landscaping blog: My dear friend and colleague, landscape contractor Ken Foster of Terra Nova … Continue reading

11 Holiday Gift Programs That Benefit Nonprofits and Make the World A Better Place :: 2011 Edition « Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits

While my favorite shopping option is Buy Nothing Day (followed closely, in at least two senses, by Buy Local Day – I succeeded with both this year), there are often a few people that we wish to get gifts, but we don’t want to burden with ever-more meaningless stuff.

This list has a nice mix of stuff-less-ness and stuff that at least helps someone and means something:

11 Holiday Gift Programs That Benefit Nonprofits and Make the World A Better Place :: 2011 Edition « Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits.

Are you a nutter?

A Fall Field Guide: Nuts.

Ah, Mother Earth News… I knew you when.  In fact, I probably read this article when it came out in 1988, in the library at Diablo Valley College.  My fondness for MEN was one of the things that began to distance me from the other members of Dark Refrains and Velvet Darkness, the RHPS casts to which I belonged in my late teens (in contrast, my fondness for young men was widely known and made me rather popular in those circles).    It was partly MEN and partly a natural history class at DVC that got me so interested in wild foraging.

Now, the interest is mostly intellectual.  I read about it (faves include The Flavors of Home and Mushrooms Demystified), and I look for plants I know when I do go out for hikes, but mostly I’ve restricted my foraging to berries and miner’s lettuce. I did gather and prep some Valley Oak acorns once (fairly tasty, if labor-intensive).

Sadly, the nuts described in the MEN Fall Field Guide to Nuts are mostly those from the eastern half of Turtle Island (or Isla Tortuga, or if you must, North America).  Out here in Cali, we get acorns and pine nuts.   What about hazelnuts?

Still, the thing I liked most about this article was the use of “nut” as a verb.  Go nutting, be a nutter.  It just made me smile.  Hopefully, you too.

Save the Knoll

A local site in Santa Cruz is in dispute. Remains attributed to the native Ohlone tribe have been found, with the site dating back about 6000 years. Local Ohlone heroine Ann Marie Sayers, along with local archaeologists, anthropologists and community members, are petitioning the city government to respect the sacred nature of the site and halt “development” work there.

About the Knoll | Save the Knoll – activist site with online petition

Ancient Ohlone Village and Burial Site Uncovered in Santa Cruz – news article