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KSR: The question is…

Kim Stanley Robinson is one of my favorite science fiction writers.  His works include some of the better collapsitarian novels, The Wild Shore and Forty Signs of Rain, plus the brilliant Red Mars.  He gives a thoughtful response to the question “Is it too late?”

So on to the much better question: How much of the biosphere can we save? Similarly, how much of civilization can we save (and what parts do we most want to save)?

Sustainable Living, NTU Style

So, I’m finally moving into my first green building!  We’ve moved into one of the apartments at the top of Crescent Hall.  Erik has posted some pictures at colorjedi.tumblr.com, such as:

Crescent Hall, NTU, SingaporeClever features of this building include

  • the rainwater bioswale system you can see
  • shading structures to keep the direct sun out
  • some solar panels on the rooftops
  • double-glazed windows and insulation to keep the cool air in
  • air conditioners that are paid for with usage cards, so users can track how much that luxury is costing them
  • water heaters that benefit from waste heat from air conditioner use, and have “eco” mode (only heat on demand) as a default, and a vacation mode to not heat at all

Learn more about NTU’s sustainable building efforts here.

 

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Thanksgiving, as Told by Wednesday Addams…

Thanksgiving, as Told by Wednesday Addams…

A great article that captures one of my favorite film moments, by Alexa Carrasco at Paste Magazine.

“Wait. We cannot break bread with you. You have taken the land which is rightfully ours.”

And then comes, the monologue. The lines Christina Ricci delivered so bold, so dead-pan we didn’t know whether to laugh, cry, or hide our eyes in fear…

“Years from now, my people will be forced to live in mobile homes on reservations; your people will wear cardigans and drink highballs.”

 

European Excursion and EfS

Just a quick update on my last month of work and play…

Durloch Tower grounds, Karlsruhe, Germany

I traveled to Europe to give a talk for the Mensch-Gesellschaft-Umwelt (Man-Society-Environment) program at University of Basel, then present at the International Greening Education Event (I’m on Day 3) hosted by the European Organization for Sustainable Development.  Then we did some tourism.  Erik is posting pictures from our adventures at http://colorjedi.tumblr.com/.

Since our return, one of my major projects has been working to organize the next Education for Sustainability (EfS) in Asia conference – Post-Secondary Education for Sustainability in Asia 5-6 Feb 2015.

Ebola and Applied Cultural Evolution—You Can Help

Michelle Y. Merrill, Ph.D.:

Using sensitive social science and evolutionary thinking to find solutions to complex, emerging problems.

Originally posted on Social Evolution Forum:

A colleague of mine named Beate Ebert started a Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) called Commit and Act in Sierra Leone. They run a psychosocial center in Bo, a city in the south of Sierra Leone, led by a local counselor, Hannah Bockarie. Bo is a high risk area of the Ebola epidemic, where some of the first cases showed up. One reason that the disease is so deadly is that it creates a perfect storm of cultural confusion. Here is how Beate described it to me in a recent email message.

Ebola mostly spreads because of local habits like washing and kissing dead bodies. People don’t get the information needed. They avoid hospitals as most people with Ebola die there. Doctors and nurses look like monsters in their prevention suits when they come to villages. The inhabitants are scared and think the health workers bring the disease. People circulate text messages…

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Singapore’s outsized footprint

Singapore is putting some efforts into improving sustainability, but that doesn’t mean we’re outpacing the problem.

From Channel News Asia:

Singapore was found to have the seventh-largest ecological footprint [per capita]– a measure of the population’s demands on natural resources – out of more than 150 countries.

MtFaberStandard view - Photo by Erik S. Peterson

Read more: Lion City’s green ranking worsens

And then there was the transboundary haze at the beginning of the week:

Haze rating Monday night – mostly from fires on Sumatra.

So while there are glimmers of hope in the smog, it’s not all sunshine and roses here on the little island of Singapore.  There’s plenty of work left to do!

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Evidence of illegal logging activity detected by conservation drones in Gunung Leuser National Park

Michelle Y. Merrill, Ph.D.:

More logging in Leuser – ouch! At least the Gunung Leuser National Park officials seem to have given an appropriate response. Here’s hoping those conservation drones can catch more illegal loggers before they do much damage.

Originally posted on :

The ConservationDrones Asia Team and the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP) flew two separate missions over a part of the Gunung Leuser National Park (Indonesia) between two time periods barely a few months apart. In these two drone images you can see clear evidence of illegal logging within the national park. The loggers even left a strip of forest on the river bank to conceal the patch of logged forest from view. These images were given to park officials who subsequently acted to stop the logging activities.

Before

After

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